Advice on care
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Advice on care

Experts in paying for care

What is Long Term Care?

Long term care is the term given to the long term care provided to individuals, (either in their own home, in community settings or residential care homes), to help with everyday activities such as eating, bathing and dressing, because of age, disability or illness. Such long term care is either provided voluntarily by any spouses, family or friends, or is provided by professional carers, paid for by the individual or by local authority social service departments.


Our Hope

We all hope that our retirement will be a long and happy one and that we can go on living independently in our own home until we die. In reality with increasing life expectancy, is that many of us will probably need some form of long term care.


Types of long term care


Domiciliary Care

This is a term given to care you receive in the comfort of your own home and is provided either by the local authority, private carers or a mix.

Sometimes referred to as community care it is designed to provide the extra care needed when family can't provide it and is designed to try and help the person in need, live independently as long as possible.

There is no national laid down criteria and local authority provision will differ from authority to authority but will normally only be available once care is assessed as either "substantial" or more commonly "significant" and is means tested.

Any financial help towards the cost of this care is means tested and unless you qualify for NHS Continuing Healthcare you are unlikely to receive any if your capital /savings (and property if single, divorced or widowed) is more than just £23,250 (England) £24,000 (Wales) £26,250 (Scotland) -2015/16. If it does exceed this you will then be deemed to be able to self-fund it and you should consider care fee funding plans.

To read more about domiciliary care and whether you could qualify for any financial help towards it visit domiciliary care.


Intermediate Care

Provided by the NHS this is a short period of intensive care designed to try and rehabilitate the person needing care to allow them to return home.

Usually provided at home, it can be offered after a spell in hospital or even in a care home.

It is normally provided free of charge but only for 6 weeks.


Residential Care

Formally described as care in a care home without nursing, this is where care is received on a full time basis in a specific residential care home.

Residential care homes are distinct from nursing home (or to give them their official name – care homes with nursing) because residential care homes do not have a full time state registered nurse on duty and any are designed just to provide adult social care – help with daily activities including wasting, toileting, eating etc.

Medical needs are addressed, as and when required by a visiting GP or district nurse. Once medical needs become more acute and/or regular - nursing care will normally become necessary either resulting in a move to a nursing home or move to a nursing ward or floor if the care home currently in is a dual registered home, i.e. offers both residential and nursing care.

Any financial help towards the cost of this care is means tested and unless you qualify for NHS Continuing Healthcare you are unlikely to receive any if your capital /savings (and property if single, divorced or widowed) is more than just £23,250 (England) £24,000 (Wales) £26,250 (Scotland) -2015/16. If it does exceed this you will then be deemed to be able to self-fund and you should then at least consider care fee funding plans (formerly called care fee annuities).


Nursing Care

This is the level of care required when apart from ordinary social care needs, there is also regular medical needs requiring supervision.

Nursing Homes or "care homes with nursing" to give them their formal name, differ from residential care because they cater for more severe and intensive needs and have a full time state registered nurse on duty at all times.

They are inevitably more expensive, but when anyone is formally assessed as needing nursing care and you receive that care in a nursing home, you will also qualify for an extra state payment – the Registered Nursing Care Contribution which is now £156.25 per week in England, or £78 per week in Scotland 2016/17 but this is paid directly to the nursing home and they reduce your fees accordingly.

State help with paying for care

Any local authority help towards the cost of this care is means tested. Unless you qualify for NHS Continuing Healthcare you are unlikely to receive any Local Authority help if your capital /savings (and property if single , divorced or widowed) is more than just £23,250 (England) £24,000 (Wales) £26,250 (Scotland)2016/17 although in Scotland such means testing is only applied to paying for accommodation costs (Please see Paying for Care in Scotland for further information if you need care in Scotland). If it does exceed this amount you will have to self-fund when you should at least consider care fee annuity or care fees funding plans and look to receive professional care fees advice.

Request your Care Fees Consultation

Your specialist and highly qualified adviser will be able to can help you; look at all care options and explore ways you could save considerable sums of money.

   

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The information contained in this web site is for general information only and is not financial, investment or tax advice. It is also subject to the UK regulatory regime and is therefore restricted to consumers based in the UK. If you would like to discuss a particular issue or generally ask us how we can advise on your particular situation then please contact us.

Advice on Care is a trading style of Keith Hargraves who is an appointed representative of Intrinsic Financial Planning Limited and Intrinsic Mortgage Planning Limited, which are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Intrinsic Financial Planning Limited and Intrinsic Mortgage Planning Limited are entered on the FCA register (http://www.fca.org.uk/register/) under reference 440703 and 440718.

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